PEER BENEFITS Jappreet Sethi writes on how to improve your peer-level relationships at work

Career coaches and veteran CEOs alike understand and constantly stress on the importance of managing peerlevel relationships at work. In fact, this is one of the toughest competencies for an individual to build. 
EVALUATE THE MAN IN THE MIRROR 
    
Mentally review the worst situations that you have to encounter while dealing with your peers; 
    Anticipate how the other party will respond when you go about protecting your turf, time or resources in your accustomed manner; 
    Now decide whether you like what you see, or if you would ask such a person to change. 
LEARN TO RESERVE JUDGMENT 
If you feel a certain action is unwarranted, confront your peer directly and explain why you feel that a certain action was inappropriate. If you feel that it is not serious enough for direct confrontation (or if you simply lack the nerve for it), suspend judgment and get on with your own tasks. 
ALLOW YOUR PEERS TO SAVE FACE 
If you do decide to confront a peer over a perceived transgression, do so privately and allow him or her to save face. If you make a public issue out of it, two things can happen – the matter may snowball into a fullfledged inter-departmental battle with each side looking to score. 
DON’T STRIVE TO WIN 
Organisations are not sprint races wherein you have to win every time. If you win all inter-departmental debates and all issues are always settled in your favour, you will be generally despised and mistrusted. Losing diminishes anyone’s self-esteem, and nobody who has lost selfesteem because of you will cooperate with you in the future. 
AVOID FACE-OFF SITUATIONS 
You can never fully anticipate how another person will react to confrontation. If a peer over-reacts and gets abusive, you must be able to walk away and not be dragged to the down-anddirty stage. Thereafter, let the dust settle for a couple of days. If your peer does not refer to the matter again and it remains unresolved, put it to your manager minus the emotions. 

 

Source: Economic Times

Date: 6/5/2014

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